The Problem


Gaps in the security barrier allow Palestinians to enter Israel illegally on a daily basis, including terrorists.

The Solution


Complete the security barrier to maximize Israeli
security and preserve conditions for two states.

NIMROD NOVIK


Nimrod Novik is the Israel Fellow for the Israel Policy Forum (IPF). In addition to Israeli security and political circles, Novik maintains close contacts with the Egyptian intelligence community; Jordanian security establishment; Palestinian political leadership and Saudi security experts, as well as with senior US, European, UN and other relevant officials dealing with Middle East policy.

Prior to that, for close to a decade he served as Advisor on Foreign Policy to Shimon Peres during his tenure as Prime Minister and Vice Premier. During those years he was involved in all foreign policy matters including negotiations with Arab leaders; negotiations with Moscow over Soviet Jewry, restoring bilateral relations and establishing intelligence cooperation, as well as Middle East policy, and with Beijing over establishing diplomatic relations. He thence served as a Special Ambassador of the State of Israel and an Advisor to the Israeli National Security Council.

Novik is a member of the board of CIS (Commanders for Israel’s Security); and the Board of Governors of the Peres Academic Center.

Key Recommendations


Completing the security barrier should include an indefinite Israeli freeze of settlement construction in the West Bank east of the barrier and an Israeli preparedness to acknowledge that territories east of the barrier would constitute a future Palestinian state, pending a negotiated agreement.

INCREASED INTEL COOPERATION

Deeper intelligence cooperation and operational coordination with Arab states along with new venues to discuss security-related misunderstandings and peacefully resolve conflicts.


INNER ENVELOPE

An 'inside envelope' of cooperation, consisting of: Israeli, Palestinian and Jordanian cooperation to address security cooperation as relates to the West Bank; and Israeli, Palestinian and Egyptian cooperation to address security cooperation as relates to the Gaza Strip.


OUTER ENVELOPE

And an ‘outer envelope’ – that would be open to Arab states in the region, such as Saudi Arabia, its GCC partners, and possibly other states in North Africa and elsewhere, providing Israel an opportunity to engage with the broader Arab world on a wider range of regional challenges.

The Ma'ale Adumim Gap


Ma’ale Adumim is the largest Israeli settlement in the West Bank with 40,000 residents. Virtually all Israelis believe that Ma’ale Adumim will be annexed to Israel as part of any future agreement with the Palestinians. This consensus view is why efforts to annex Ma’ale Adumim have begun to gain support on the right. There are two dangers with annexing the area:

REGIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL CONSEQUENCES

Any annexation of the West Bank absent a negotiated agreement could lead to immediate and long-term consequences both in the region and in the international community.


ELIMINATES PALESTINIAN CONTIGUITY

The area that currently constitutes the Ma’ale Adumim bloc to be annexed incorporates territories that would eliminate the possibility of a contiguous Palestinian state.


The Gush Etzion Gap


The Gush Etzion gap is a distinct security threat to Israeli citizens.

REGIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL CONSEQUENCES

Any annexation of the West Bank absent a negotiated agreement could lead to immediate and long-term consequences both in the region and in the international community.


ELIMINATES PALESTINIAN CONTIGUITY

The area that currently constitutes the Ma’ale Adumim bloc to be annexed incorporates territories that would eliminate the possibility of a contiguous Palestinian state.


The security barrier, initially erected in 2003 by Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon in response to the wave of suicide attacks during the second intifada, has proven to be an effective hindrance to terrorism. However, gaps remain in the barrier that leave Israeli citizens vulnerable to this day. Two gaps in particular – surrounding the Ma’ale Adumim and Gush Etzion blocs – should be closed.Closing these gaps should be done in a manner that maximizes Israel’s security and the future viability of a negotiated two-state solution.

Completing the Security Barrier Would:


IMPROVE ISRAELI SECURITY

Enhance the security of Israeli citizens living in these communities and throughout Israel.


PRESERVE A TWO-STATE REALITY

Limit the growth of these settlement blocs in ways that creates de facto two-state reality on the ground, absent an agreement.